Wild creatures 'speak out'

The Spirits of Birds, Bears, Butterflies and All Those Other Wild Creatures

The Spirits of Birds, Bears, Butterfliesand Other Wild Creatures

 The Spirits of Birds, Bears, Butterflies and All Those Other Wild Creatures

This book makes the readers feel like  they are watching this scene!

 

(You can skip the details directly below to view summaries of the book's prologue, introduction, and then the chapter by chapter descriptions with photos.)

Book's Blog: Nature Controls All Living Spirits at

http://www.blogger.com/blogger.g?blogID=6448737385857915286#allposts

 This Particular Domain Name:  birdscrittersbutterflies.webs.com

Focus: Book Sales Aimed at Educating All Ages, Particularly The Young, About Spiritual Interactions among wild creatures and humans.

Size of Paperback Book: 314 pages

 It is recommended By Dr. John Briggs, Professor of Writing Linguistics and The Creative Process at Western Connecticut State University, who is himself an author of several books: 

 "This is charming. I very much enjoyed reading it. The tone seems just right, the voice as well. It makes a low-key convincing case for paying attention to the wildlife around us 
and appreciating what interchange is going on."
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The book is also recommended here:  Copyright © 2012, THE HARTFORD COURANT  Sunday, August 19, 2012 CRITICS' CHOICE  Edition: STATEWIDE Section: ARTS Page: G2
Connecticut Author  Local E-Book This non-fiction book is about Williams' experience with wild creatures around his Litchfield house, a yellow saltbox build in the summer of 1776 for Rebecca Osborn.  Here's an excerpt from his introduction:  "It took all of my seven decades for me to gradually absorb what has now become a belief: wildlife not only interacts with people, but communicates with them, most often when those mortals have no idea it is happening. So, by habit, wildlife is much more conscious of inter-communications among all living beings than humans are. What convinced me of that, beyond all doubt, were two experiences with butterflies many years apart. This is the first of several short tales included later in this book."  For more information: http://epub-ebooks.net/sample/144328/the-spirits-of-birdsbears-butterflies-and-all-thoseother-wild-creatures.  

Additionally the book was written up in The Litchfield News: 

 Williams Publishes An ebook About Spiritual Link Between Humans and Wild Animals

By MICHELLE MERLIN
For The Litchfield News

LITCHFIELD — Thomas “Dennie” Williams feels right at home outside with birds and butterflies. His house, which is on land his family has owned for three generations, is full of them — and growwing gr growing up he regularly wandered through the acres of woods and marveled at the wildlife around him.

After retiring as an investigative and court reporter for the Hartford Courant, Williams decided to write a book about the spiritual connectivity between humans and wild animals.

He published his new ebook, “The Spirits of Birds, Bears, Butterflies and All Those Other Wild Creatures,” through Smashwords, an ebook distributor. The book catalogues, in 14 stories, the interactions Williams and others have had with nature, mostly birds and butterflies.

“I want [readers] to understand that if you have this realization that animals, birds and fish have this spiritual ability to interact and intercommunicate, then we as people will be so much better not only to wild creatures but to the environment because we will realize that that’s their home,” said Williams.


It was Williams’ investigative senses that started his idea for the book.

About three years ago, he was in a blueberry patch when a butterfly landed on him. After flying away a few times, it kept returning to him. He thought that the behavior was strange and exciting

The instance called to mind another memory in which Williams had been talking to an old man in Vermont. Two butterflies circled around his head and became more animated as the man’s story did. Williams found this too to be unusual.

“When you’re an investigative reporter you cannot resist investigating something that is a mystery,” said Williams. “You have this butterfly who is being chummy to you — and why?”

Williams decided to see if there were other instances of human-wild animal interaction and found he was not alone.

“You have to investigate it or [readers] will think you’re writing fiction and that’s the last thing you want to do. You want to tell the truth and have people realize that there’s a spiritual world out there that connects human beings and creatures,” said Williams.

Growing up, Williams spent a lot of time outdoors, and remembers being deeply influenced by his experiences on his family’s property. He used to chase ducks down the river, in the area that’s now the Livingston Ripley Waterfowl Conservancy. He also spent time in Barnard, Vermont, where he enjoyed the outdoors as well.

It is also written up in The Royal Gazette in Bermuda:

 

The Royal Gazette | Bermuda News, Sports, Events, & Community

By Nadia Arandjelovic

Published Nov 29, 2012 at 8:17 am (Updated Nov 29, 2012 at 8:16 am)

Author Thomas reveals his true nature

When US investigative journalist Thomas (Dennie) Williams stumbled on a story of a sailor who had a unique encounter with a bird off the shores of Bermuda, he decided to get to researching.

The story of former Bermuda resident Christopher Profit is now featured in Mr Williams’ first novel ‘Nature Controls All: The Spirits of Birds, Bears, Butterflies and All Those Other Wild Creatures’.

It is part of a collection of 16 tales about the interaction and communication between humans and wild creatures.

Mr Williams thought of the idea for the book after a butterfly landed on his hand and stayed for 15 minutes. He said the encounter had a huge impact in his life, but only through reading the book could someone “fully understand the significance and reality” of that.

In Mr Profit’s case he was sailing to the Island from Massachusetts to find a job when he ran into a 48-hour storm in the Atlantic Ocean.

After taking a severe beating by the wind and rain, he continued on his journey towards Bermuda in sunny weather.

At one point he put his hand on the tiller and a swallow landed and stayed for ten minutes. Mr Profit was inspired by the bird who had also survived an incredibly dangerous storm and felt as though it was his spiritual companion in a time of near death.

Mr Williams learned of the man’s adventure while visiting the Island.

The author said he was immediately inspired by the story as it “perfectly related” to the theme he was writing about. The biggest challenge was tracking down Mr Profit, who now lives in Canada. He eventually found him for several telephone interviews.

In the book he also writes about a Chilean Flamingo who escaped from a bird sanctuary in Connecticut and flew to Canada.

The bird became the focus of an intense rescue effort as winter closed in, Mr Williams explained. It was eventually saved by a well-known bird and animal rescuer who developed a special bond with the animal.

Also featured is Michael Pixley of the US Fish and Wildlife Service, who tells about his inspiring rescue of water birds after the severe oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010.

Mr Williams, a former investigative reporter for The Hartford Courant in Connecticut, hoped the book would encourage others to see the importance of wild creatures and the need to protect them.

He said: “One of the critical issues facing the world today is the vital obligation to preserve and protect the environment.

As a result of the momentum of destruction of nature worldwide, it will take generations, if ever, to repair all the damage. Hopefully the erosion, already generations old, will not continue at its present pace.

But, whatever happens children, teenagers and adults need to educate themselves as much as possible to the very soul of nature.”

He said the book was his “small and humble effort” to catch the attention of readers and help them understand the need to better appreciate wildlife.

Once people, at as early an age as possible, become educated to the needs of wild life, the less destructive they will be towards nature during their lifetimes, and perhaps they will even become devoted to help the causes of all living beings including those humans other than themselves,” he continued.

If the skill to appreciate nature and interact with wild creatures is honed at an early age, it becomes almost impossible not to take up or support environmental protection causes as one grows older.”

Mr Williams has visited Bermuda more than a dozen times, and met his wife on Elbow Beach in 1969.

He said the most rewarding part of the book was finding out that his own interactive experience with the butterfly “was indeed an incredible interaction with a wild creature”. He described it as “a spiritual experience with nature's critters” and said it was great to know others had experienced this as well.

Nature Controls All: The Spirits of Birds, Bears, Butterflies and All Those Other Wild Creatures’ is available on www.amazon.com for $12.

Article at: http://www.royalgazette.com/article/20121129/ISLAND/711299916

 Paperback Book Cover

 

 Book Description:

This is a book of true to life nature tales emphasizing animal and bird interactions and communications with humans. The tales start with a short poem about Chickadees and end with a poetic tour through the Costa Rican jungle. The book opens with a prologue relating how the author became fascinated with animals and birds through family influences and experiences. Then, in an introduction, it explains the significance of interactions and spiritual communications among birds, animals and other creatures with humans. Finally, it starts with the first of thirteen true stories of interesting interaction and unique communication among people and birds and animals. It is a relatively original nature project because few books or even articles I have ever read deal with such spiritual inter-communications with real life stories attesting to it.

Mission

One of the critical issues facing the world is the vital obligation to preserve and protect the environment from humans. As a result of the momentum of destruction of nature world-wide, it will take generations, if indeed it is possible, to repair all the carnage. Hopefully the despoliation, already centuries old, will not continue at its present pace. But, whatever happens children, teenagers and adults need to acclimate themselves as much as possible to the very soul of nature.

This book and its short true-to-life tales aim at catching the attention of as many readers as possible to the need to treasure wildlife. This book demonstrates repeatedly that wild creatures can and do communicate their vital needs to people around them, even if most humans don't listen, observe or understand their many attempted interactive approaches.

Once individuals, at as early an age as possible, become educated to the vital needs of wild life, the less destructive they will be toward environments during their lifetimes. Perhaps, they will even become motivated to conserve nature for the sake of all living beings including themselves. If the skill to appreciate nature and interact with wild creatures is honed at an early age, it becomes almost emotionally and intellectually impossible not to take up or support environmental protection causes as one grows older. Hopefully this book will convince some youngsters or mature adults of the need to actively preserve and protect nature.

On the other hand, the nature tales in this book look largely upon the positive side of the relationships among people and wild creatures. They are lively, poetic and funny stories all with a focus on interaction, not always friendly, among people and birds and animals.

Some of them involve my own experiences at all ages. In order to put those stories and the book in perspective, I open up with my own family background, not at all as an ego trip, but to show how I very gradually, over the decades, became a kind of minor league nature fanatic.

On the other hand, however, the first short story, “Blueberries, Butterflies and The Pig,” explains, how only at a late age, as a so called senior citizen, I finally realized there exists a spiritual, fascinating and inspiring interaction among humans and wild creatures, in this case butterflies, and people. Of course, that only occurs if the person already has a sensitive and regular appreciation of wild creatures. After some weeks of thinking about these butterfly experiences, it occurred to me that I and some close friends had a reservoir of experiences interacting with birds and animals.

But the butterfly episodes were the actual inspiration for the book. After some weeks of thinking about these butterfly experiences, it occurred to me that I and some close friends had a reservoir of experiences interacting with birds and animals. Additionally, I am a trustee of two nature preserve, the Livingston Ripley Waterfowl Sanctuary and the Constance B. Ripley Land Trust 

Table of Contents
Prologue
It recounts how the author grew up among family gradually influencing what became his deep appreciation of wildlife. Ultimately, decades later,  it led to his belief in the spiritual, simultaneously touching both hearts and souls inside wildlife and people. But, that materialized only in the past couple of years. As I said, that awareness arose after the writer had that unique experience with a friendly butterfly that perched for perhaps ten minutes on the back of his hand as he roamed around a local blueberry patch showing other pickers his new found friend. A day or two later, that startling experience flashed the mind back decade earlier when he observed two butterflies continuously swirling around the head of a Vermont farm country character. The butterflies seemed intrigued as the lively, arm waving old man spun a tale about how a night earlier, he and a friend eventually captured a runaway pig in the woods. The two butterfly experiences awakened this author to a startling reality. That is even an insect can use its camaraderie to amaze the imagination of humans: to make them wonder if its spirit is actually bonding with them. After researching and writing this book, the author not only believes in such bonding, but seeks it out as creatures fly, walk, run or swim by him.

However, those butterfly experiences would have been meaningless without the author's inspiration from an aunt and uncle, John and Julie Forman, private school founders for children with learning disabilities. Their religious and spiritual beliefs drove them into beautiful wilderness areas to tent out, canoe, horseback ride and explore occasionally with their nephew and his family. The author might never have understood the potential for wild creature interchange without another uncle, Dr. Dillon Ripley, who, as a famous ornithologist who collected wild ducks in his man-made pond, tested his nephew to identify almost every bird they saw or heard during their walks in the woods or along the edges of lakes and ponds.

Introduction - People Believe In Communications With Pets But Rarely Wildlife
A deeply researched explanation of how wild creatures communicate and connect with humans in all sorts of fascinating situations. It is an inquiry by this career investigative journalist of a number of real life events displayed on the Internet through You Tube and a host of other sites with credible evidence of the extraordinary and inspiring spiritual interplay among humans and a host of wild creatures.

 60 Minutes: Swimming Unprotected and Playing with White Sharks



One included a Sixty Minutes program segment in which the reporter, Anderson Cooper, gets together with a white shark lover and expert, "The Sharkman" Mike Rutzin and they dive beneath the surface of the ocean at the very tip of South Africa. Although you can almost see the fear in Cooper's eyes, he follows Sharkman into the ocean depths to see apparently friendly sharks playing bump the body with Rutzin and then observe him hold onto a shark's fin to take a ride with the big fellow. Well, there are all kinds of wild creature friendships with man. While interviewing Ian Gereg, Director of Aviculture and Education at the Livingston Ripley Waterfowl Conservancy, whose lived his life for ducks, geese and birds of all kind, I had to chuckle. When I toured the duck facility one day a group of a half dozen baby white geese were following Ian's every move right next to his heels! When Ian spoke, they made regular clucking sounds. When he fell silent and stopped walking, they did too. Amazed, I looked directly at Ian and exclaimed: “What are the geese doing?!” Ian immediately replied, “They think I'm their mother.” Well, they sure acted like his babies!

But more than that the introduction contains general descriptions of the beauty in nature's scenes that if appreciated become inspiration for all living beings, no matter how wild, to understand and appreciate one another.

Here's one!

A spring morning arrives in a Litchfield, Connecticut woodlands near a big farm field. The awakening is the sound of the wind blowing through multi-pointed Maple leaves. First the sound is a soft, rushing one like water flowing swiftly through a narrow brook. But, as the wind increases it becomes more like a rock-covered waterfall. It slows and the sound drops to gentle again. In the foreground, light green leaves wave back and forth on their stems. Looking deeper and higher, they create scores of ghostly shadows against the light blue sky and the sparkling bright yellow
light of the sun. A solo male red Cardinal sings lightly, and then a Robin joins in. Seconds later, the Cardinal and its pink-brown mate sing in tandem. Other birds chirp and sing from farther away. Some of the area birds flew thousands of miles, round trip from more southern climes to return to New England in the spring to sing the songs nature's fans have come to enjoy and know so well. Some even fly thousands of miles one-way without stopping.

Poem

Chickadees and The Ancient Birder, a short poem, that sets the tone for the nature tales that immediately follow. It describes the author standing near a bird feeder ready to fill it as the snow fell lightly from the sky and singing chickadees flew over his head nearby, undeterred from their continuing feeder feedings and rapping with the man holding their sunflower seeds.

As mentioned above, Blueberries, Butterflies and The Pig, explains a length, how only at a late age, as a so called senior citizen, the author finally realized there exists a spiritual, fascinating and inspiring interaction among humans and wild creatures, in this case butterflies, and people.

Its beginnings? Suddenly a little orange butterfly with miniature black specks flies speedily around me and lands right on my extended right hand! As it retracts its wings, I see the buff orange- brown color on the bottom of those wings, its two little antlers above its tiny head and its legs attached to its diminutive body. I glance at the little guy. My outstretched arm and hand freeze.

In seconds, the little one takes off and flies up and around and then down again on the back of my waiting right hand. This time it stays. I then began walking around and showing it off to anyone who would look and listen.

Eventually, I made my way to a field outside of the blueberry patch and engaged a small boy and girl then rolling their bodies down a grassy green hill. I told the lively boy to calm down, but of course, he didn't. His movement startled the butterfly which then flew in the air 30 to so feet above me. As I turned to look back at the two children, I exclaimed how disappointed I was that my friend had disappeared. Just then, my wife walked out of the patch and exclaimed that my butterfly had dipped down and landed on my ear.

I didn't believe her, but it had so I showed the creature off to the woman selling blueberries. Then, as I got ready to get into our car, the butterfly, sensing I was leaving, flew off my ear. Days later, I continued thinking about this butterfly and others I had seen.

Suddenly, my mind flashed back a decade or so and recalled an incredible episode. As we were standing on a General Store porch looking over a lake on a sunny day, a Vermont farm character,without warning or introduction, abruptly and surprising regaled me with a story of his chase of a pig a night earlier. As the story's excitement jumped up and down inside the old man's wispy white head and he made waving motions with his arms, I noticed several small white butterflies darting above his head. As the story got wilder, the butterflies flew and darted faster; as the words waned, they slowed to wider swoops. When the old man began walking away, the flyers disappeared toward the lake.

The Adventures of a Canadian-Bermudian Sailor excitingly relates how that boatman looks for boat building or repair work in his diminutive boat along the New England coast from Maine to Massachusetts. Once he discovers there are no jobs he can find, a friend he stops to visit on Cape Cod suggests Christopher sail on to his former digs in Bermuda. A hurricane with his nickname, Chris, has just passed by them going north in the Atlantic Ocean. But, they theorize that storm will clear the ocean for a safe sailing. Off Christopher goes alone on what he figures should be a 10-day trip. But, just two days' distant from Bermuda, he runs into the storm of his life. Miraculously, Christopher and his sailing ship survive 48 hours of high winds and ever dangerous waves. Once the storm has swept by, Christopher resets his sails in beautiful sunny weather. With his ever steady hand holding the tiller, he steers onward. No long after his fresh start, a migrating swallow lands right on top of Christopher's steering hand and stays for a 10 to 15 minute visit. The wild feathered creature checks out the captain eye-to-eye, cleans itself off with beak and one perch leg and then looks out over the beautiful blue salt water. Christopher is amazed and inspired. After the swallow flies off, Christopher comes to believe the bird and he became mated as two miraculously surviving storm spirits. Once he makes it to Bermuda, Christopher's good fortune continues as he finds work as a boat mechanic.

 Here's the man with the bird in hand, Christopher Profit, after he beat the ocean storm; had a swallow land on his boat steering fist afterward; and finally sailed next to North Rock, outside of Bermuda harbor. (Photo by Tony Cordiero for The Royal Gazette)


A Farm Boy Becomes a Spiritual Man of Nature is relates how a country boy grew up on a Litchfield farm and as he absorbed the outdoors, wildlife, the cattle and hens, he became more and more aware of the spirits of nature. Here is the beginning of Peter Litwin's experience:
Some noise, some movement or maybe even some instinct made the farm boy in his early teens look up in the clear blue sky on a beautiful sunny fall day with the leaves gleaming through the tree branches in full color.

“There hovering in the breeze was the albino red-tailed hawk...The sunlight came through all of the feathers of the hawk. I remember being awestruck by the beauty of its feathering. The sunlight on the other side of the feathers of the hawk created almost like an X-ray vision of this bird...I could see it's wing bones, and I could see it's sort of skeleton framework mostly on the wings through the sunlight which filtered through the feathers I was awestruck by it and somehow at that moment there was a connection in a most profound and deep way between the bird, between me and the sun and the whole indescribable beauty of the experience.”

Even today, long after Peter's hawk experiences as a boy, he continues to tell that story and a host of others, including his family's temporary adoption of a three-legged doe injured accidentally by a mowing tractor. Once the deer had grown up a bit and recovered, the Litwins released her and were later thrilled when they heard from a friend that the three-legged one was still roaming the forest.

The Savior of Baby Wild Animals of All Kinds tells in detail how a Connecticut woman, Susan Dwyer, became savior, nurse, mother and friend to baby creatures of all kinds. In one instance, Susan is alerted by a city resident to a small female raccoon trapped overnight in some fencing and scared nearly to death by a huge barking dog just out of reach from his potential prey. Susan took the mentally frozen raccoon home to her shelter, and with a tiny glass liquid dropper fed her. After several months of care, Susan released the raccoon into the woods near her home. About a month and a half later, the raccoon returned, spotted Susan, then retreated momentarily to the woods, and minutes later, came back with “five beautiful babies.” After showing them off, said Susan, the mother returned to the woods with the little ones never to be seen again by her.

Saving Birds and Other Wildlife is the story of two rescuers of wild creatures during the horrifying drill pipe oil gush in the Gulf of Mexico. Carissa Kent, working for an independent environmental team, and Michael Pixley, a rescuer for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, tell their separate stories of inspiring rescues of water birds during the aftermath of one of the worst ocean oil spills in world history. Both grew up believing in creating their own interactions with wild creatures to include turtles, birds and snakes.

Just the sight of a Pelican waddling helplessly on the beach and dripping head to toe in black or orange-brown crude oil is so horrifying it compels a nature-lover to look away in hopes the images were simply a bad dream. Unfortunately, they were not! “Those images, the news feeds, never left me. Sometimes I worked 20-hour days. Just seeing the pelicans covered in oil (on television and in person) made me feel I could go for another 21 hours,” says Carissa.

Working seven days a week from 12 to 14 hours a day, starting at 6 a.m., Michael says he can never forget his two months of wildlife experiences in the Gulf. His area of assignment was the most attractive and populated for many bird species, because there are so many small protected nature islands for their nests. Just on Queen Bess Island alone, he explains, four and a half thousand to seven thousand nesting pairs of a variety of birds make their home.

The Black Bears Repeatedly Raid Bird Feeders is a personal anecdote about confrontations with Black Bears and how they relate to similar experiences of others. In one instance, the invading bear, after being chased from the feeder, decided to show off rather than to run away.
The big fellow actually seemed a bit curious about the two of us as we stalked it from 20 or more yards away. Soon, the furry one dropped down and waddled off in a rush toward the brook as if to fake a jump into it. But, instead, it veered back in the opposite direction in a diagonal straight toward the vicinity of one of the plastic tube bird feeders ripped down previously by the other bear. It stopped suddenly next to a large Maple tree and immediately looked like it was ready to climb. Instead, the big fellow raised up again on hind legs, put one paw against the tree and stared at us. Its rounded ears stood straight up. Its brownish snout, with no teeth showing, was pointed right at us. His big, glaring brown eyes and curved mouth made him look mischievous. Bears sometimes claw and rub their smell onto a tree to mark it territorially, but that was not happening. It looked like the bear was actually smiling at us. I was not amused until I thought about his image in my mind much later. I can still see him standing there and looking at us.

 

 

The Squirrel Roams hatches descriptions of how the nutty creature roams, eats, plays and occasionally stays home with the kids.

 A Topps Baseball Card

 The Great White Hunter is a humorous narration by the author's oldest buddy of his childhood dream to become a great white hunter like Daniel Boone and how his fantasy crumbled while pursuing a squirrel. On the way back, he said, I couldn’t help but think how casually I regularly dispatched those squirrels, sitting nearby in the apple trees, from my bedroom window upstairs. Here was an innocent animal minding its own business, trying to survive, and the rookie hunter was trying to kill it with gunfire to ultimately cut off its tail. I ventured out many times into forests after that day, but had lost my Daniel Boone swagger and my taste for killing squirrels.

 


Squirrels, The Acrobats, The Raiders, The Flying Invaders relates a personal ongoing history of the author’s experiences with squirrels throughout his life that eventually leads from hostility to peace and humor.

The One Time Haunting Korean Hunt: In this story, the author confesses to a once in a lifetime wildlife-hunting excursion on the dangerous mine-infested border between North and South Korea. The hunt is serenaded with a loud, haunting, micro-phoned backdrop of an infamous American soldier, who defected to North Korea, propagandizing that dictatorship's attributes to all who listen. The author drew this story into his book decades after the hunting episode from a letter he wrote back to the States to his mother and father who saved the missive for him and gave it to him years later for his memory's sake.

 

Check It Out And Think About It: Being a Vegan Makes Sense For Humans and Grizzlies Alike checks into some philosophical thinking about hunting and eating.


The Falcon and The Great Blue Heron tells how intricate, face-to-face separate episodes with two birds created fear, hostility and friendliness for them from a medical doctor who had previously turned his back yard into a vineyard.

Besides being a busy doctor, John Fulkerson is a wine maker in a countrified setting: old stone walls, rusty red barns, brooks and forests, part of the rolling hills of Litchfield, Connecticut. John’s grape vines are part of a landscape with a variety of trees and two gentle, rolling fields. He and his wife, Lynn, an avid gardener, are finely tuned to the sounds and movements of wild animals and birds. John and birds of prey were not strangers. He has watched Hawks, Falcons and Vultures swoop over his neighborhood. These birds, all of varying sizes, have sharp eyes, muscled wings and large talons. They prey on mice, ground squirrels, rabbits, reptiles, and even weak, small birds.

He tells of one episode in which a one-foot tall Merlin Falcon got snarled in one of his blueberry nettings and he had to rescue it very carefully. He used a pair of scissors to gradually cut the netting as the bird struggled for its life. At first, as a captive, the Falcon looked angry. But ultimately, it recognized a friend when he saw one. The falcon stayed near John on the ground as it recovered. John, afraid it would not be able to fly away, startled it up in the air. The Falcon, now sporting one talon mangled from its struggles with the wound up netting, flew haltingly into the blue sky above. “But then,” John explained, “instead of flying away in fear, it flew up about thirty feet in the air above and circled almost directly above my head before then flying away into a nearby tree line and disappearing.”

His other story telling experience began with hostility and ended with friendly amazement at the doings of a Great Blue Heron which had decided to "steal" one of John's pond stocked Rainbow Trout.

John, who sneaked down a hill to get nearby, yelled and waved a stick at the heron, scaring it into the air. Like a slow motion flying plane with too much luggage, the heron flapped, flapped and flapped. It finally rose several feet into the air and veered away from John as he chased after it. The heron flew low through a gap in the trees across one small field and into the far end of another. There it momentarily perched in one of the trees adjacent to the field. The trees around and above the Heron were high enough to prevent a fast exit, particularly with the weight of the trout in its beak. Meanwhile, John had picked up a couple of one-inch diameter stones in anticipation of scaring it. Before he could follow the bird into the second field, it flew out of its perch and headed right back across the second field toward John who could not believe the bird’s moxie.

As the Heron began to fly right by John in the tree-gap between the two fields, John threw one of the stones in a line he estimated was too far in front to hit it. As it turned out, the stone passed about 10 yards in front of the Heron’s face, causing it “to drop the trout practically at my feet!” said John. “That was a conquest!” said John, “this was my territory not his.”

The Heron then rose gradually, but as rapidly as it could into the open sky! It finally disappeared. Meanwhile, John ran to the spot where the fish dropped, and carried it up hill to the house. The deliciously cooked trout became an unexpected breakfast treat for his wife Lynn and himself, instead of a raw one for the obviously disappointed Heron.

Hawks Nesting In The City Find Tragedy and Inspire Humans as Fans and Fanatics: Two Red-tailed Hawks decide to build their nest on top of a large beautiful Eagle sculpture, a cornerstone of the roof for the historic and busy Hartford, Connecticut, Superior Court. Their adventures capture the imaginations of almost everyone inhabiting or visiting the court during the summer.

As a news reporter for The Hartford Courant, the author and Bob MacDonnell, a photographer, wrote this story with his photos, of course.

For months, the struggles of a family of red-tailed hawks nesting atop Hartford Superior Court have rivaled any courtroom drama unfolding inside.

The spectacle -- the birth of two chicks over Easter weekend, the death of their mother a week later and the father hawk raising the fledglings alone -- has captured the attention of court clerks, jurors, uniformed sheriffs, lawyers in business suits and neighborhood residents all spring.

Daily, dozens of people gathered along Washington Street, craning their necks for views of the hawks nesting on an eagle sculpture at the civil court. Some bring cameras while others train binoculars on the birds.

Now with full permission of The Courant, I bring it back with a huge amount of new details.

Hummingbird Tea: A simple sweet water feeder attracts a throng of busy Hummingbirds eventually showing their host homeowners how to keep them happy and sociable. But, more startlingly the author learns that Hummingbirds can recognize who fills up the feeder and when it empties knows how to attract the necessary attention to get it filled. Not only does the writer tell his family adventures with Hummingbirds, he tells others' adventures as well. One, shown on a You Tube video shows a man who rescued an injured baby Hummingbird holding it in his palm outside in anticipation that the bird's mother will take notice. She does and eventually lands on his hand to
feed it.

 

Hummingbird Mom Feeds Baby in Hand


The Adventures and Wild Flights of Eilish: An adventure story about a Chilean Flamingo named Eilish who escaped a Connecticut bird sanctuary in the in the late fall and flew north to Ontario, Canada. There it became the focus of an intense rescue effort as winter closed in. Its savior was a well-known bird and animal rescuer who became so close to the creatures she rescued that they became her spiritual friends. I quote a brief account inside The Courant which I did not quote in my tale: "Eilish -- or a runaway that fits her description -- has become an international fugitive. The 3-pound, 20-year-old female Chilean flamingo that eluded captors in a Connecticut River cove several times last month was last seen flying upriver soon after a failed rescue mission Oct. 22, 1997. This month, a female Chilean flamingo estimated to weigh 3 pounds and be 20 years old took up residence in a bay on the Ottawa River." It's a fascinating tale that ends happily with Eilish's rescue as a winter that could have been deadly to her set in.

 Eilish is discovered flying over the Connecticut River in East Hampton in September 1997 before she decides to fly north into cold Canada. She instinctively is flying that direction because Chilean Flamingos fly north in colder weather to reach warmer climes. (Hartford Courant photo)  

Chilean Flamingos flying near the Andes Mountains. Photo by Ben Hall Photography at http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.benhallphoto.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/chilean-flamingos-in-flight-over-andes-mountains1.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.benhallphoto.com/workshops/patagonia-course-2010/&h=298&w=550&sz=88&tbnid=Gey3myjDPmm53M:&tbnh=63&tbnw=117&zoom=1&docid=BTT_XYa-CNt1DM&hl=en&sa=X&ei=L59XT9HPDYfq0gG0n4DMDw&ved=0CC8Q9QEwAA&dur=578


Kathy Nihei and Friend (From The Ottawa Citizen)

Big Daddy Swan Protects His Brood From The Road Runners: The famous annual Litchfield Road Race was the scene of a dramatic confrontation between a competitive runner and a male swan trying to protect his mate and their brood from a rush of roadrunners. The author was right on the scene and photographed the swans and the runners both before and after the dramatic episode.

Awesome Birds, Frogs, Snakes, Crocs and Insects Inside The Costa Rican Jungle: This is the crescendo: a poem about a trip through a Costa Rican jungle with a native nature guide who closely interacts with birds, lizards, snakes, insects and most jungle dwellers
.

ISBN:  9781478336730

Goodreads blog for book reviews and recommendations: 

     <style>

  #goodreads-widget {
    font-family: georgia, serif;
    padding: 18px 0;
    width:575px;
  }
  #goodreads-widget h1 {
    font-weight:normal;
    font-size: 16px;
    border-bottom: 1px solid #BBB596;
    margin-bottom: 0;
  }
  #goodreads-widget a {
    text-decoration: none;
    color:#660;
  }
  iframe{
    background-color: #ffffff;
  }
  #goodreads-widget a:hover { text-decoration: underline; }
  #goodreads-widget a:active {
    color:#660;
  }
  #gr_footer {
    width: 100%;
    border-top: 1px solid #BBB596;
    text-align: right;
  }
  #goodreads-widget .gr_branding{
    color: #382110;
    font-size: 11px;
    text-decoration: none;
    font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;
  }
</style>
<div id="goodreads-widget">
  <div id="gr_header"><h1><a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2956.The_Adventures_of_Huckleberry_Finn">Goodreads reviews for The Spirits of Birds, Bears, Butterflies and All Those Other Wild Creatures</a></h1></div>
  <iframe id="the_iframe" src="http://www.goodreads.com/api/reviews_widget_iframe/6939272.Dennie_Williams?did=DEVELOPER_ID&format=html&header_text=Goodreads+reviews+for+The+Spirits+of+Birds%2C+Bears%2C+Butterflies+and+All+Those+Other+Wild+Creatures&isbn=0142437174&links=660&min_rating=&num_reviews=&review_back=ffffff&stars=000000&stylesheet=&text=444" width="575" height="400" frameborder="0"></iframe>
  <div id="gr_footer">
    <a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2956.The_Adventures_of_Huckleberry_Finn?utm_medium=api&utm_source=reviews_widget" class="gr_branding" target="_blank">Reviews from Goodreads.com</a>
  </div>
</div>

    
  #goodreads-widget {
    font-family: georgia, serif;
    padding: 18px 0;
    width:575px;
  }
  #goodreads-widget h1 {
    font-weight:normal;
    font-size: 16px;
    border-bottom: 1px solid #BBB596;
    margin-bottom: 0;
  }
  #goodreads-widget a {
    text-decoration: none;
    color:#660;
  }
  iframe{
    background-color: #ffffff;
  }
  #goodreads-widget a:hover { text-decoration: underline; }
  #goodreads-widget a:active {
    color:#660;
  }
  #gr_footer {
    width: 100%;
    border-top: 1px solid #BBB596;
    text-align: right;
  }
  #goodreads-widget .gr_branding{
    color: #382110;
    font-size: 11px;
    text-decoration: none;
    font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;
  }
</style>
<div id="goodreads-widget">
  <div id="gr_header"><h1><a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17376589-the-spirits-of-birds-bears-butterflies-and-all-those-other-wild-creatu" mce_href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17376589-the-spirits-of-birds-bears-butterflies-and-all-those-other-wild-creatu">Goodreads reviews for The Spirits of Birds, Bears, Butterflies and All Those Other Wild Creatures</a></h1></div>
  <iframe id="the_iframe" src="http://www.goodreads.com/api/reviews_widget_iframe/6939272.Dennie_Williams?did=DEVELOPER_ID&format=html&header_text=Goodreads+reviews+for+The+Spirits+of+Birds%2C+Bears%2C+Butterflies+and+All+Those+Other+Wild+Creatures&isbn=9781478336730&links=660&min_rating=&num_reviews=3&review_back=ffffff&stars=000000&stylesheet=www.birdscritterbutterflies.webs.com&text=444" mce_src="http://www.goodreads.com/api/reviews_widget_iframe/6939272.Dennie_Williams?did=DEVELOPER_ID&format=html&header_text=Goodreads+reviews+for+The+Spirits+of+Birds%2C+Bears%2C+Butterflies+and+All+Those+Other+Wild+Creatures&isbn=9781478336730&links=660&min_rating=&num_reviews=3&review_back=ffffff&stars=000000&stylesheet=www.birdscritterbutterflies.webs.com&text=444" width="575" height="400" frameborder="0"></iframe>
  <div id="gr_footer">
    <a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17376589-the-spirits-of-birds-bears-butterflies-and-all-those-other-wild-creatu?utm_medium=api&utm_source=reviews_widget" mce_href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17376589-the-spirits-of-birds-bears-butterflies-and-all-those-other-wild-creatu?utm_medium=api&utm_source=reviews_widget" class="gr_branding" target="_blank">Reviews from Goodreads.com</a>
  </div>
</div>

    
  #goodreads-widget {
    font-family: georgia, serif;
    padding: 18px 0;
    width:575px;
  }
  #goodreads-widget h1 {
    font-weight:normal;
    font-size: 16px;
    border-bottom: 1px solid #BBB596;
    margin-bottom: 0;
  }
  #goodreads-widget a {
    text-decoration: none;
    color:#660;
  }
  iframe{
    background-color: #ffffff;
  }
  #goodreads-widget a:hover { text-decoration: underline; }
  #goodreads-widget a:active {
    color:#660;
  }
  #gr_footer {
    width: 100%;
    border-top: 1px solid #BBB596;
    text-align: right;
  }
  #goodreads-widget .gr_branding{
    color: #382110;
    font-size: 11px;
    text-decoration: none;
    font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;
  }
</style>
<div id="goodreads-widget">
  <div id="gr_header"><h1><a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17376589-the-spirits-of-birds-bears-butterflies-and-all-those-other-wild-creatu" mce_href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17376589-the-spirits-of-birds-bears-butterflies-and-all-those-other-wild-creatu">Goodreads reviews for The Spirits of Birds, Bears, Butterflies and All Those Other Wild Creatures</a></h1></div>
  <iframe id="the_iframe" src="http://www.goodreads.com/api/reviews_widget_iframe/6939272.Dennie_Williams?did=DEVELOPER_ID&format=html&header_text=Goodreads+reviews+for+The+Spirits+of+Birds%2C+Bears%2C+Butterflies+and+All+Those+Other+Wild+Creatures&isbn=9781478336730&links=660&min_rating=&num_reviews=3&review_back=ffffff&stars=000000&stylesheet=www.birdscritterbutterflies.webs.com&text=444" mce_src="http://www.goodreads.com/api/reviews_widget_iframe/6939272.Dennie_Williams?did=DEVELOPER_ID&format=html&header_text=Goodreads+reviews+for+The+Spirits+of+Birds%2C+Bears%2C+Butterflies+and+All+Those+Other+Wild+Creatures&isbn=9781478336730&links=660&min_rating=&num_reviews=3&review_back=ffffff&stars=000000&stylesheet=www.birdscritterbutterflies.webs.com&text=444" width="575" height="400" frameborder="0"></iframe>
  <div id="gr_footer">
    <a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17376589-the-spirits-of-birds-bears-butterflies-and-all-those-other-wild-creatu?utm_medium=api&utm_source=reviews_widget" mce_href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17376589-the-spirits-of-birds-bears-butterflies-and-all-those-other-wild-creatu?utm_medium=api&utm_source=reviews_widget" class="gr_branding" target="_blank">Reviews from Goodreads.com</a>
  </div>
</div>

    
  #goodreads-widget {
    font-family: georgia, serif;
    padding: 18px 0;
    width:575px;
  }
  #goodreads-widget h1 {
    font-weight:normal;
    font-size: 16px;
    border-bottom: 1px solid #BBB596;
    margin-bottom: 0;
  }
  #goodreads-widget a {
    text-decoration: none;
    color:#660;
  }
  iframe{
    background-color: #ffffff;
  }
  #goodreads-widget a:hover { text-decoration: underline; }
  #goodreads-widget a:active {
    color:#660;
  }
  #gr_footer {
    width: 100%;
    border-top: 1px solid #BBB596;
    text-align: right;
  }
  #goodreads-widget .gr_branding{
    color: #382110;
    font-size: 11px;
    text-decoration: none;
    font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;
  }
</style>
<div id="goodreads-widget">
  <div id="gr_header"><h1><a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17376589-the-spirits-of-birds-bears-butterflies-and-all-those-other-wild-creatu" mce_href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17376589-the-spirits-of-birds-bears-butterflies-and-all-those-other-wild-creatu">Goodreads reviews for The Spirits of Birds, Bears, Butterflies and All Those Other Wild Creatures</a></h1></div>
  <iframe id="the_iframe" src="http://www.goodreads.com/api/reviews_widget_iframe/6939272.Dennie_Williams?did=DEVELOPER_ID&format=html&header_text=Goodreads+reviews+for+The+Spirits+of+Birds%2C+Bears%2C+Butterflies+and+All+Those+Other+Wild+Creatures&isbn=9781478336730&links=660&min_rating=&num_reviews=3&review_back=ffffff&stars=000000&stylesheet=www.birdscritterbutterflies.webs.com&text=444" mce_src="http://www.goodreads.com/api/reviews_widget_iframe/6939272.Dennie_Williams?did=DEVELOPER_ID&format=html&header_text=Goodreads+reviews+for+The+Spirits+of+Birds%2C+Bears%2C+Butterflies+and+All+Those+Other+Wild+Creatures&isbn=9781478336730&links=660&min_rating=&num_reviews=3&review_back=ffffff&stars=000000&stylesheet=www.birdscritterbutterflies.webs.com&text=444" width="575" height="400" frameborder="0"></iframe>
  <div id="gr_footer">
    <a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17376589-the-spirits-of-birds-bears-butterflies-and-all-those-other-wild-creatu?utm_medium=api&utm_source=reviews_widget" mce_href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17376589-the-spirits-of-birds-bears-butterflies-and-all-those-other-wild-creatu?utm_medium=api&utm_source=reviews_widget" class="gr_branding" target="_blank">Reviews from Goodreads.com</a>
  </div>
</div>  #goodreads-widget {
    font-family: georgia, serif;
    padding: 18px 0;
    width:575px;
  }
  #goodreads-widget h1 {
    font-weight:normal;
    font-size: 16px;
    border-bottom: 1px solid #BBB596;
    margin-bottom: 0;
  }
  #goodreads-widget a {
    text-decoration: none;
    color:#660;
  }
  iframe{
    background-color: #ffffff;
  }
  #goodreads-widget a:hover { text-decoration: underline; }
  #goodreads-widget a:active {
    color:#660;
  }
  #gr_footer {
    width: 100%;
    border-top: 1px solid #BBB596;
    text-align: right;
  }
  #goodreads-widget .gr_branding{
    color: #382110;
    font-size: 11px;
    text-decoration: none;
    font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;
  }
</style>
<div id="goodreads-widget">
  <div id="gr_header"><h1><a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17376589-the-spirits-of-birds-bears-butterflies-and-all-those-other-wild-creatu" mce_href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17376589-the-spirits-of-birds-bears-butterflies-and-all-those-other-wild-creatu">Goodreads reviews for The Spirits of Birds, Bears, Butterflies and All Those Other Wild Creatures</a></h1></div>
  <iframe id="the_iframe" src="http://www.goodreads.com/api/reviews_widget_iframe/6939272.Dennie_Williams?did=DEVELOPER_ID&format=html&header_text=Goodreads+reviews+for+The+Spirits+of+Birds%2C+Bears%2C+Butterflies+and+All+Those+Other+Wild+Creatures&isbn=9781478336730&links=660&min_rating=&num_reviews=3&review_back=ffffff&stars=000000&stylesheet=www.birdscritterbutterflies.webs.com&text=444" mce_src="http://www.goodreads.com/api/reviews_widget_iframe/6939272.Dennie_Williams?did=DEVELOPER_ID&format=html&header_text=Goodreads+reviews+for+The+Spirits+of+Birds%2C+Bears%2C+Butterflies+and+All+Those+Other+Wild+Creatures&isbn=9781478336730&links=660&min_rating=&num_reviews=3&review_back=ffffff&stars=000000&stylesheet=www.birdscritterbutterflies.webs.com&text=444" width="575" height="400" frameborder="0"></iframe>
  <div id="gr_footer">
    <a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17376589-the-spirits-of-birds-bears-butterflies-and-all-those-other-wild-creatu?utm_medium=api&utm_source=reviews_widget" mce_href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17376589-the-spirits-of-birds-bears-butterflies-and-all-those-other-wild-creatu?utm_medium=api&utm_source=reviews_widget" class="gr_branding" target="_blank">Reviews from Goodreads.com</a>
  </div>
</div>

    

 http://www.goodreads.com/api/reviews_demo_widget_iframe/6939272.Dennie_Williams?isbn=978-1478336730&num_reviews=3&min_rating=&header_text=&header=660&links=660&text=444&review_back=ffffff&background=E9E5D3&stars=000000&height=400&width=575&stylesheet=www.birdscritterbutterflies.webs.com

Free sample of the book at:  http://www.smashwords.com/extreader/read/144328/3/the-spirits-of-birds-bears-butterflies-and-all-those-other-wild-creatures

The paperback book can be purchased on the Internet at either one of these two sites: http://www.amazon.com/Spirits-Birds-Bears-Butterflies-Creatures/dp/1478336730/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1348686952&sr=1-1&keywords=The+Spirits+of+Birds%2C+Bears%2C+Butterflies

https://www.createspace.com/3952248

Barnes & Noble's Nook Books at http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/The-Spirits-of-Birds-Bears? store=allproducts&keyword=The+Spirits+of+Birds%2C+Bears

It is out on Kindle as well at http://www.amazon.com/Spirits-Birds-Butterflies-Creaures-ebook/dp/B009ECKLYU/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_2?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1360794748&sr=1-2-fkmr0&keywords=the+spirits+of+birds%2C+
bearsand+All+Those+Other+Wild+Creatures
 
The E-Book was re-released for publication by Smashwords the third week of February 2013. It is also available for purchase at Kobo: http://www.kobobooks.com/ and at
 
Diesel-Ebooks at http://www.diesel-ebooks.com 
 
at Apple iPad/iBooks, Nook and Sony Reader.